Ginny's Adventures 2006 travel blog

Sign for the "front" entrance - not the one for me to...

Centerpiece of the Donor Recognition Plaza - a work in progress

First of 5 carvings in the Plaza - what Habitat does and...

I may go on a Women Build project once I get a...

Beginning of a trip through impoverished areas of the world - giving...

Inside of one of houses in the Poverty Section - there are...

Church - TV doesn't work; no electricity; it's a sign of hope,...

bunk beds for lots of kids in a small space - newspaper...

Congo house built by HFH - Fullers first started in Zaire; still...

A look inside - kitchen in center; small bedrooms on left; BR...

Mexican house - outside private area is important to them

Kenya house built with bricks made onsite

Sri Lanka home - costs less than any other model

Papua New Guinea where they have two monsoon seasons


Americus is only 10 miles east of Plains and it is the home of Habitat For Humanity. So, this was another place to check out before continuing south.

I had to cross over railroad tracks (of course) but the road and the tracks were in bad shape and I cringed while crossing over them. I almost went past the place because I came in on the back end, as directed, and the sign for the parking lot was small. The building is also unobtrusive - the non-profit is humble and that's good, really.

It is a good place to visit and learn how Habitat works around the world - they call it their Global Village. What's on display is a short film and model buildings - showing the poverty and substandard housing people endure in 3rd World countries and examples of what Habitat builds for them. Houses are built out of the natural resources of the area and in tune with their culture. I took pictures of every house, inside and out. I'll only share a few, so as not to bore you!

The film points out that people who "get" a Habitat house don't get a freebie. They not only have to put in lots of hours on Habitat builds, they have to prove they can make the payments. The houses are sold at cost without interest but must be paid for by the homeowners. Payments and our donations are used to procure materials and pay the skeleton crews that supervise builds and administer the company. They truly have no desire to make a profit, but to provide decent housing for people all over the globe. They will only go where they are invited and where their principles are respected and followed. While Habitat is a Christian organization, prospective homeowners do not have to be.

Carter did NOT start Habitat For Humanity - Millard and Linda Fuller did in 1976.

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